Review of: Lol Eports

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On 20.04.2020
Last modified:20.04.2020

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Lol Eports

Mehr von LOL Esports auf Facebook anzeigen. Anmelden. Passwort vergessen? oder. Neues Konto erstellen. Jetzt nicht. Ähnliche Seiten. League of Legends. Not just an esport. The future of sport. And Worlds is our time to Take Over. The journey to crown the greatest League of Legends team on the planet starts. Die League of Legends World Championship ist ein alljährlich stattfindendes E-Sport-Turnier, das von Riot Games – dem Spieleentwickler von League of Legends – veranstaltet wird. League of Legends ist ein Computerspiel aus dem MOBA-Genre, in dem.

League of Legends World Championship

Not just an esport. The future of sport. And Worlds is our time to Take Over. The journey to crown the greatest League of Legends team on the planet starts. Official account of LoL Esports. Subscribe for live broadcasts from LEC/LCS and international events like the World newportloftslv.com've also got videos focuse. ALIENWARE X LEAGUE OF LEGENDS ESPORTS. ALIENWARE AURORA. Setzen von Maßstäben bei E-Sports. Alles zählt.

Lol Eports JULY 5, 2016 Video

Game 3 INF vs OCN - Honda Scouting Grounds 2020 (Final)

Rekkles has spent a total of eight years with Fnatic, split over two periods with the organization and has picked up 26 first-place tournament finishes, playing games and an impressive KDA. At G2 Esports he’ll look to build on another impressive season in with a new roster and finally get himself some international silverware. League of Legends | G2 Esports One of the best rosters that Europe has ever created, this multiple title winning superteam is here to take down titans and change everything you know about League of Legends. You can catch them competing weekly in the League of Legends European Championship (LEC). Our Champions in League of Legends. The ultimate hub for all your Esports needs. LoL, Fortnite, Dota 2, Valorant, PUBG, Overwatch. Streams, match schedules, tournament information, and news. We’ve got your hype covered!. The best place to watch LoL Esports and earn rewards!. Gamepedia's League of Legends Esports wiki covers tournaments, teams, players, and personalities in League of Legends. Pages that were modified between April and June are adapted from information taken from newportloftslv.com Pages modified between June and September are adapted from information taken from newportloftslv.com

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Impact rotated better through the lane swap, however, getting an experience lead that put him briefly at a three level advantage. He proceeded to push Lourlo around in lane, growing his lead, and eventually killed him 1-vs-1 when Lourlo overstepped his boundaries.

This led directly into Impact having the freedom to ultimate up top and not only save Sneaky but win an entire teamfight that Lourlo couldn't participate in.

He also secured his team a huge win when he snuck around to the flank of TL as they were sieging and got a four-man taunt. His performance fell apart in Game 2 when he could not create the same lane advantage over Lourlo's Trundle.

His Shen's late game fell apart because he couldn't stop TL's split push, and the pressure left them losing their entire base all at once.

Game 3 had a similar pattern. Impact individually defeated Lourlo in the lane. He got an early kill on the Shen off a gank and was heavily out-farming him.

The issue was that Lourlo was teleporting into teamfights and finding assists and kills not just for himself, but for all of Team Liquid.

C9 could no longer support themselves off of just an Irelia who ended up with three of the team's four kills. Impact, despite losing to Lourlo overall, was a large part of all of Cloud9's successes, ending with an Analysis: Meteos had a decent series, ending with a 2.

The low kill participation percentage came mainly from Game 1, which was only seconds away from beating the record for latest first blood.

Despite that, Meteos found ways to help in the later stages of the match, always present in teamfights and helping to secure the Baron.

It ended as a clean, low-kill win. It was Game 2 where Meteos began to falter. He was still present in teamfights, but all he managed to contribute was damage versus the engage and CC that Dardoch continually used to lock up C9.

Meteos did manage to get the miracle Baron steal that kept C9 afloat for as long as they did, and he had a stellar performance in the teamfight where TL made the mistake of trying to fight 4-vs-5, but his play wasn't enough to turn the game around.

In Game 3, Meteos showed a bit of technical prowess, as his kill in the bottom lane was thanks to a timely use of his flash and body slam, but ultimately his play was sloppy.

He picked Gragas for the displacement, but never managed to land the barrel on priority targets, usually getting the tanky Rek'sai which accomplished little in the teamfight.

He was constantly being invaded upon by Dardoch, and although he managed to secure most of his camps, it speaks to a larger lack of pressure.

Analysis: We have come to expect a high level of play from Jensen after this recent winning streak with C9, but by the end of Friday's series his play had fallen apart.

He ended with a KDA ratio of only 1. He ended with the most deaths of anyone on his team, going down five times in both of C9's losses. Game 1, Jensen started off strong, playing to his usual high standard.

He was ganked several times but never went down due to his ability to dodge skillshots perfectly and judge exactly where he had to be.

And he was very sure in his abilities, going forward to almost solo out Matt under turret, and immediately chaining his CC on the stuns when diving midlane.

His damage was the main force that carried C9 to victory. Game 2 was where it started going downhill. Although he still demonstrated his ability to get out of danger, avoiding a four-man gank without even blowing a summoner, the focus that TL put on him eventually wore him down and he gave up first blood.

Despite being on Twisted Fate, Jensen could not unbalance teamfights because TL was almost always there first. Jensen was continually caught and bursted out, usually before a fight began giving Liquid their early Dragon control.

Even in the teamfights that Cloud9 managed to win, such as the 4-vs-5 in mid lane, it was at the expense of Jensen's life because Liquid could burst him out so easily.

In Game 3 this focus was only exacerbated, as Jensen ended with a 0. His usual precise play fell apart as he found himself constantly caught out of position or away from his team.

Analysis: Sneaky got off to a great start in the series, winding up with his favorite Ashe pick. His opposition Fabbbyyy was unable to get involved in any fights thanks to the fact that Sneaky was a bother, routinely landing arrow after arrow, getting picks and setting up plays.

As usual, C9 was always there to back him up, collapsing as soon as Sneaky hit his ultimate and chaining huge amounts of CC on to whoever happened to be caught.

Sneaky also knew how to follow up on his teammates, securing a huge teamfight win with an arrow directly into Impact's four-man taunt.

Sneaky had an impressive solo play, 1-vs-1 killing Fenix's Zilean in the top lane and converting it into another kill on Matt. The final play succeeded because of Impact coming in as well as the rest of C9, but it was Sneaky's quick fingers and on point mechanics that gave them the opening.

Game 2, however, quickly started to fall apart for Sneaky, who, to his credit still managed to maintain a kill participation percentage despite the loss.

The painful loss in Game 3 was, however, arguably Sneaky's fault. He walked into Liquid's jungle alone pre-minions spawning and died to Fabbbyyy.

Then he and Bunny Fufuu proceeded to die over and over to multiple ganks by Dardoch and Lourlo. He was so far behind in the end that there was almost nothing he could do or contribute, even his wave clear against the siege was blocked by Matt's Braum.

With their mid lane and AD carry so far behind, there was nothing Cloud9 could do against Liquid's onslaught.

Analysis: Bunny Fufuu has been very impressive recently with his ability to land skillshots and time CC layering, but in Friday's series he seemed to be struggle.

His Bard play in Game 1 was decent, as his ultimate was mainly used for disengaging. He had a couple of solid ultimate uses, tower diving mid lane second tier, for instance, but then seemed to just focus on piling up ridiculous amounts of CC, rather than C9's usual careful layering.

It was enough to win teamfights, however, and eventually the game. When Bunny came back in for Game 3 he pulled out Bard, and his timing on Bard seemed to be even worse than it had been on Braum.

While his ultimates were well placed, often catching two or more members of Liquid the issue was in his follow up.

Bunny mistimed his binding consistently, leaving him unable to continue chaining down the enemies he caught in his ultimate and rendering it almost useless.

Teamfights that Cloud9 should have had the upper hand on fell apart because they simply could not coordinate their abilities like a team the way they had in Game 1.

Bunny was unable to save Sneaky from the constant ganking in Game 3, usually going down himself as well.

His mechanics were simply not up to the level seen in his recent victories. Analysis: Smoothie, despite the loss, had a very solid performance on Friday.

He came out with not only a 4. His Magical Journey out of the early fight near bottom lane saved every one of his teammates who were on the verge of death.

His binding on Lourlo after he was hit by Sneaky's arrow gave them the time to secure the kill, and his second binding gave them the time to disengage before the second half of the fight.

His ultimates were almost always used to try and interrupt Fabbbyyy's damage, and considering the accuracy on his Curtain Call's, it was likely that Smoothie saved his team from a disadvantageous start to a fight.

Smoothie couldn't always protect his team, however, as his Magical Journey gave Fabbbyyy an easy shot at fleeing targets and Smoothie himself was picked off trying to escape a Baron fight.

Despite Smoothie's strong play, he wasn't able to help Cloud9 take the game back, it just allowed them to hold on longer to a losing matchup.

Analysis: Lourlo had a bumpy start to the series, but his team continued to prioritize him and eventually he helped lead them to victory.

Game 1 Lourlo picked Fiora confidently, despite the fact that Impact was on Shen, and the results were disastrous.

Lourlo fell behind heavily in both farm and experience, and was pushed around early in lane. He tried to push up and be aggressive, counter-jungling despite being behind in levels, and Impact solo-killed him.

This mistake set the pace of the game. Lourlo was unable to split push because of Impact, and he could barely teleport into fights because he was either chunked out by Shen or had wasted his ultimate just trying to stay alive.

Team Liquid had put almost all of their win condition on Lourlo, and with their poor teamfight they were easily rolled over and destroyed by C9.

The series turned around in Game 2 Lourlo however. Team Liquid still gave him priority, first picking the Trundle to give him a favorable lane matchup.

This time Lourlo did not fall behind, as he was able to push Impact around a bit in the 1-vs-1, but he still made some early mistakes.

He overestimated his abilities, trying to tank for a teamfight before he had the stats to succeed and dying quickly, and later trying to solo kill Sneaky and being picked off when Smoothie came in from behind.

He was also caught out by an Ashe arrow and killed, giving Cloud9 a teamfight that was almost enough for them to come back.

Lourlo fell behind early, going down in farm and dying to Meteos' ganking, but it was his global pressure that set his performance apart from the first two games.

He was everywhere, picking up kills and assists in the top lane and finding teamfights in mid. It furthered Impact's farm lead, but Lourlo quickly caught up and surpassed him in gold until he was so tanky that he could ignore Impact completely and split push successfully for his team, destroying Cloud9's base all in one fell swoop.

Analysis: Dardoch was a monster on Friday, finishing the series with a 9. His Game 1 was a bit of a flop, the extended lane swap meant very little room for ganking, and he was unable to steal the Baron away from Cloud9.

Usually he wasn't involved in fights until the very end, and during the one he was involved in, he tried to unburrow two Cloud9 members that were still in his own Bard's Tempered Fate.

That breakdown in communication kept them from achieving anything more than the initial pick off kill. Dardoch picked up after that, with an exceptional mechanical performance on Gragas in a game that ended up being remade due to a bug, but it was the beginning of his rise.

He continued showing those skills in the real Game 2, helping his mid laner get first blood, interrupting Bard just before he could take the Magical Journey, knocking up two enemies and keeping them in place for Fabbbyyy and the rest of TL to secure multiple kills.

He no longer suffered from being on the outside of teamfights, in fact he was faster at collapsing than C9's team, which was designed to collapse.

He was Liquid's tank and often their engage and, despite having a Baron stolen out from under him, brought TL to a decisive victory.

Game 3 this trend continued. Dardoch ended with the best scoreline on his team, posting a deathless game and a KDA ratio of He saw his opportunity to help snowball Fabbbyyy after Sneaky gave up a free early kill and he took it, getting early kills on both Sneaky and Bunny Fufuu, as well as a clean near-ace from a well set up tower dive.

Dardoch coordinated well with Lourlo, bringing him into the middle of fights before knocking every one up and giving Fabbbyyy and Fenix time and space to take everyone down.

With Dardoch keeping Sneaky down early, it was an easy win for Team Liquid. Analysis: Fenix helped bring his team to one of the first series upset in NA this Summer.

He finished with a 4. His Game 1 on Zilean was unimpressive, despite earning the only kill for his team early on, he couldn't turn it into anything further.

He later over-confidently tried to duel Sneaky and ended up not only dying, but luring in Matt to die too.

He failed to execute the Bard and Zilean combo properly, either missing the bombs while Cloud9 was frozen or simply not being in range to capitalize upon Matt finding an enemy.

Game 2, however, he came out swinging, picking up first blood on Jensen through repeated ganks on the mid lane. He kept the lane pushing in his favor, keeping Jensen from having the map pressure Twisted Fate is supposed to provide.

In fact, Fenix's teleports several times gave him a better entrance into a team fight than Jensen had. He had some missteps, such as leaving his team mid lane while he went to clear top, giving Cloud9 a chance for a pick.

It was also Fenix's hubris that made him think he could handle Meteos on the outside of the Baron pit alone, a move that gave a Baron steal to C9.

Game 3, however, Fenix stepped up again, making even fewer mistakes and finishing with a 13 KDA ratio. He bullied Jensen around in lane, and later on caught him out again and again to delete him before teamfights.

Even just walking up from mid lane Fenix had a huge impact, roaming top to help his team secure four kills on the back half of what looked like a losing teamfight.

These early advantages were already the nail in C9's coffin, as TL didn't give them any space to get back into the game. Analysis: Fabbbyyy had a fantastic series, finishing with a 7.

His Game 1 with Sivir was dismal, but not entirely his fault. He was completely unable to get into fights, and so his damage was lost, which certainly did not help TL with their already weaker teamfight composition.

It was Game 2 and Game 3 where Fabbbyyy switched on to the long range Jhin that everything clicked together. Fabbbyyy played an excellent Jhin in multiple ways, but the ability that has to be brought up first is his ultimate accuracy.

Equally good at starting teamfights as finishing them off, Fabbbyyy picked people off in Magical Journey's, he found and slowed Sneaky for the rest of his team, he stopped Baron attempts and secured towers.

Fabbbyyy's positioning was also top tier. As soon as he wasn't on Sivir who relies on getting up close and personal, he found his niche, always over a jungle wall or so far back that he wasn't drawing any of the fire.

He only died once in Game 3 when his team abandoned him to start a fight and Impact's Irelia managed to find him around the side.

Most of Smoothie's Bard ultimates in Game 2 were spent just to try and keep Fabbbyyy from dealing damage for a little bit, either cancelling his ultimate or just attempting to push him off.

Fabbbyyy demolished Sneaky in Game 3 after killing him before minions spawned and he coordinated with Dardoch to press that advantage as far as it could go.

Locking down opponents with his snares and his slows, Fabbbyyy's Jhin play was a crucial component of Team Liquid's victory over Cloud9.

Analysis: Matt finished strong on Friday with a 6. He had trouble on Bard in Game 1, failing to combo his ultimate with Zilean's double bombs even once.

He also had poor communication with his team, catching two in his ultimate just as Dardoch was going in to knock them up and thereby wasting the CC that could have netted them kills.

Matt also died the most on his team, and was not even involved in their one kill. Coming out of Game 1, however, Matt followed suit with the rest of Team Liquid and stepped up.

In Game 2 his Karma pick gave Team Liquid the move speed to counter Cloud9's collapse, and they were often in a fight even faster than the team with both Twisted Fate and Shen.

Matt's bindings were also crucial, locking enemies down for Fabbbyyy's damage or flashing forward to catch Sneaky and keep him from disengaging.

In Game 3, Matt helped Fabbbyyy get the early first blood on Sneaky, and then doubled up the lane dominance from there.

He confidently dove the turret, taking four hits before leaving in order to get Fenix two kills on the other side.

His shield was more practical utility, helping the siege by keeping Sneaky from wave clearing. In the end it was the unrelenting pressure of all of Team Liquid that brought down Cloud9 and ended their win streak.

Analysis: There were very low expectations for zig and Phoenix1 coming into their series on Saturday. Game 1 saw a little bit of hope, however, for the beaten down P1.

In the initial lane swap, Phoenix was not nearly as far behind TSM as most teams usually are. They kept up with the tempo enough that they forced TSM into more commitment for the early Dragon.

They used their speed to collapse on an over-aggressive Hauntzer and kill him for first blood. This gave zig the lane he needed as he started to push it in aggressively towards Hauntzer, picking up several more kills on his lane opponent.

He outdueled TSM's top laner, and he coordinated well enough with the rest of his team that TSM wasn't able to get big objectives off the map.

The issue was that zig and Inori also weren't gaining any map advantage from the kills, and so when zig joined his team in a teleport fight bottom side, they simply weren't strong enough to beat TSM's superior teamfighting skills.

In Game 2, P1 no longer came out even from the lane swaps, as some careful greed from Hauntzer gave him extra experience and the ability to safely farm under turret against the duo lane while zig was both zoned off and occasionally killed by a gank.

This lack of farm trapped him in the top lane, unable to teleport in for most of the early fights, and the lack of gold made him unable to tank the brunt of TSM's damage.

He did come out of the series with an 80 percent kill participation, and hopefully an idea of what to improve upon going into the second half of the split.

Analysis: Inori, who had been unable to start for weeks thanks to ongoing visa issues, was able to get off to a strong start on Elise. Coming out of the lane swaps, he saw that Hauntzer was over confident and desperate to pick up the CS that he normally gets when TSM wins the tempo game.

Together with Mash and Gate, Inori picked up an easy first blood, zoning Svenskeren out of his blue side jungle at the same time and slashing the momentum his Nidalee had built.

He made good calls, revisiting Hauntzer for another kill, this time helping zig, and after a disastrous fight in bottom lane he went back to the well again, further punishing Hauntzer's poor play.

However, Inori failed to capitalize on anything from these kills. He never pushed down the top tier two tower even though they had plenty of time after the kills, and when he rotated for the Rift Herald his communication with zig was off and he was forced to take the buff himself.

P1 suffered from their inability to out teamfight TSM, as even when Inori found Svenskeren and surrounded him in the jungle TSM's collapse turned it into an unfavorable trade.

In Game 2, Inori had a very poor showing on Rek'sai. He tried to invade Svenskeren's jungle when his team was pushing down top turret and ended up not only being pushed off by TSM's bot lane, but also leaving Gate behind to give up first blood.

Again in the mid game teamfights he failed to land his knock up because of his predictable engage that was easily flashed away from. Besides his mechanical failings, Inori's team communication broke down, leading him to go in when Pirean had just blown his cooldowns, getting both of them killed in the process.

Analysis: Pirean had one of the worst KDA ratios on his entire team at. Mid lane was very quiet at the beginning of Game 1 as opposed to the action in the side lanes, but Pirean was able to keep up with Bjergsen in farm and trades.

It was in the major fight down bottom lane where things really started to go wrong. Pirean and zig both teleported in guaranteeing P1 the numbers advantage, but they were all locked down by one of Bjergsen's double bombs, in addition to him saving Doublelift's life with his ultimate.

The lack of respect coming out of Pirean for the matched teleport ruined the play for them, giving over a 4-for-0 kill advantage when they should have been able to take the fight.

After that Pirean seemed to grow a little bit desperate, wanting to make a big play that would get them back into the game. Almost all of P1's aggression was countered by TSM converging and their ability to win teamfights, however.

Despite using Karma, he was often not grouped together with his team and was caught out too far up in bottom lane and killed by Doublelift.

Game 2 his mechanics seemed to slip a little bit. He had good setup for ganks on Bjergsen, but simply could not land his chains to convert the damage.

Even when he did have fancy feet, it was too late, and his team was not in position to gain anything off of the time Pirean bought them.

Analysis: Mash finished with a relatively good KDA ratio of two, but only a 60 percent kill participation. In Game 1, Phoenix1 managed a rare positive start versus TSM as they were able to match their opposition's lane swap tempo.

This gave P1 the ability to keep the map pressure even, cut off Svenskeren's Nidalee domination of both sides of the jungle, and even get Mash first blood onto an over-aggressive Hauntzer who was pushed up for farm.

Early gold right after he had bought a Cull was a solid beginning, and P1 looked to continue that with an aggressive double teleport to the bot lane.

An aggressive double teleport to the bottom lane appeared to put Phoenix1 in good position to secure a major teamfight victory, but they had not anticipated Bjergsen also teleporting in and saving his AD Carry as well as completely zeroing out Mash with a well placed double bomb.

This fight, which ended in a kill and some assists for Doublelift, completely negated whatever lead Mash had found in the early game.

He quickly lost his turret, lost Dragon control, and lost the superior damage in teamfights. Tie that in with his questionable mechanical play and he ended up not even being able to take Bjergsen out cleanly in a 1-vs Game 2 all came down to a lack of initiative.

Mash was already losing out due to a very clever delayed lane swap from TSM that denied a great deal of farm.

Mash's first Ashe arrow ended badly, leaving Gate all alone in what was supposed to be an aggressive position but instead left him out for TSM to descend upon.

After that, there were a few more arrows, most of which hit Biofrost but secured a couple of kills. The issue was that Mash was never firing them.

He wasn't looking for initiations or picks, probably because he was too afraid of TSM's power, and so his Ashe went to waste and P1 had no hope of getting back in the game after only eleven minutes.

Analysis: Gate had a very sloppy series, finishing with a. He had a few good plays, helping Mash secure first blood on an over-extended Hauntzer, and killing Hauntzer top with zig, but his performance in teamfights was just abysmal.

His Bard ultimate was not just ineffective; on multiple occasions it saved the enemy it was meant to lock down. When Bjergsen was caught in mid it gave him the time to wait for his team to arrive and the Trundle pillar to disappear.

Gate also showed poor communication with his team, laying down Tempered Fate when another member of his team was about to land a skillshot on the enemy.

His play on Braum in Game 2 was mechanically better, though Braum has less chance to actively hurt his own team with his abilities than Bard does.

Gate was finding himself consistently caught out, sometimes through his own fault and sometimes because he was ready to back up a teammate that then bailed because it was no longer a good play.

Some of Gate's trouble in the match against TSM was the inconsistency and poor cohesion of the entirety of Phoenix1, but a good deal of it was his own poor mechanics and teamwork.

Analysis: Hauntzer is better than the performance he had against Phoenix1 on Saturday. The only explanation is the overconfidence that comes with being the best team in the league facing the worst team, and overconfidence is something that has plagued TSM and especially Hauntzer in the past.

TSM is used to playing an intensely aggressive game, where Hauntzer gets ahead in the lane swap because of tempo and all three lanes win and snowball the game.

P1 surprised everyone by managing to keep up with TSM's tempo in the swap, and keep Hauntzer from getting the farm he's accustomed to. Because of that, instead of adjusting his play and reverting to a safer, more defensive style where he waits at the turret, Hauntzer pushed up way too far to reach the minion wave and was punished for his hubris.

He gave over first blood to Mash and map pressure to P1 and didn't even learn from his lesson, pushing too far out in his lane again and again giving four free kills over to P1.

Even though Hauntzer brought his scoreline back up through his usual excellent play in teamfights, it didn't dismiss the fact that Game 1 was not the stomp it should have been.

Game 2, Hauntzer again made risky decisions, sticking around for more CS than the traditional lane swap, but he played it much more carefully and ended up with a lead.

He extended that lead when the rest of his team zoned off zig and killed him a couple of times. Although Hauntzer didn't end up being involved with the rest of the map for the majority of the game, he kept up the pressure on zig, keeping him from becoming a meaningful tank.

Hauntzer is a brilliant top laner, but his confidence can at times get the best of him, as seen in Game 1. Analysis: In Game 1, Mikyx used Karma. Things started off rough, as Mikyx was killed during two separate ganks in the bottom lane.

Those were his only two deaths of the game though, as he was able to help Splyce take a close Game 1. He poked down Vitality with Inner Flame and was able to effectively speed up his teammates for engages while using his shields to keep them safe when they sieged.

In Game 2, Mikyx used Bard and was able to effectively set up kills. After another close early and mid game, his Tempered Fate and Cosmic Binding combination in the late game allowed Splyce to win teamfights.

This was a well played series from Mikyx and Splyce as they upset Vitality in excellent fashion. Analysis: Kobbe was given his best performing marksman in both games against Vitality and he made it count.

He picked up his first kill in Game 1 catching kaSing out of position and then took it slow until the final teamfight. In said fight he picked up a quadra kill to help Splyce close out the victory without dying.

In Game 2, he lacked the kill upside, ending with only two, but still dealt massive damage for Splyce. He picked up a double kill after Vitality secured Baron, preventing his opponents from utilizing the buff to it's full potential.

While he had a low kill total, his eight assists in Game 2 were more than his support's assist total.

Analysis: Sencux showed off some good Azir mechanics on Friday. His use of the Shurima Shuffle usage was on full display. In Game 1 he picked up two kills, but scaled nicely into the mid game.

His poke damage when Splyce sieged with Baron buff in the late game heavily chunked down Vitality to either get them away from objectives or set up kills for his teammates.

In Game 2, he was able to kill Nukeduck early and pick up a kill in the first teamfight of the game. This allowed Sencux to scale quickly once again and his kill in the final teamfight helped Splyce take the series.

Analysis: Svenskeren had a strong series, finishing with a KDA ratio of eight, but not as strong as we usually see from him. He ended with a kill participation of only 48 percent, and despite playing on Nidalee in Game 1 he did not have the complete control over the enemy jungle that we are accustomed to seeing from him.

It took a while for TSM to get enough map pressure to leave deep wards in P1's jungle, and the majority of the ganking was against TSM rather than from Sven.

The game started off poorly when he was unable to get past Inori to save Hauntzer, and that move sacrificed his blue side jungle, negating the leash TSM had given him.

He found his way back into the game after a big teamfight bottom lane, coming in at the end to cut off P1's escape route into the jungle and give Hauntzer and Doublelift two more easy kills.

After this, Svenskeren was able to get a bit back into his old swing of things, playing around Bjergsen's winning lane and trying to snowball everywhere that wasn't Hauntzer's mess.

Still, Sven's play was sloppy and overconfident; he got caught out several times trying to ward past the river and the play was only salvaged because TSM committed to collapsing and outfought P1 even with a numbers disadvantage.

Game 2 was a complete turnaround as Svenskeren was back on pointe, helping his duo lane pick up a couple of kills on zig and playing forward aggressively.

He had an incredible fight in the jungle where he caught multiple fleeing members of P1 in the jungle with one body slam and helped his team pick up several more kills.

Svenskeren's mechanics were as precise as ever, but if it hadn't been for the teamfighting ability of TSM, Game 1 might have gone a lot worse for him.

Analysis: Trashy maintained his recent success on Rek'Sai in Game 1. Vitality took control of the early game, but a clutch Baron steal gave Splyce the pushing power they needed to turn the tide.

He was able to use his Unburrow to set up kills in the late game and finished with six assists while not dying. In Game 2, Trashy used Elise and had decent success.

He missed some cocoons throughout the game, but also landed them when he needed to. He was killed to give away first blood, but was able to provide good crowd control late while his burst damage helped Splyce win teamfights.

Analysis: Wunder used Trundle in Game 1 and played well despite a rough start. He was solo killed in a close 1-vs-1 against Cabochard to give away first blood.

He didn't let it affect him too much, however, and transitioned into teamfights excellently. He used Subjugate throughout the game to steal resistances from Vitality members and used his pillar to stop his enemies from disengaging as Splyce took the upper hand in the mid game, finishing with a team high 7 assists.

Wunder used Irelia in Game 2 and was unkillable. He got off to a slow start, but picked up his first kill after Vitality secured the Baron as Splyce won the ensuing teamfight.

He was a monster late, diving onto the back line to chunk down Vitality carries and ended the game by picking up a double kill in the final teamfight.

Analysis: kaSing used Braum in Game 1 and had limited impact. He was able to pick up two assists early, during two separate gank plays by Vitality, using his ultimate to knock up members of Splyce for kills.

He was unable to really set up plays in the late game as Vitality fell off. He aggressively used his flash to land pinpoint bindings, but also sniped members of Splyce from range setting up kills.

Vitality again got off to a good start, but struggled in the mid and late game to close out the win, ending the day by being swept.

Analysis: Bjergsen continues to impress with his stellar play on a wide variety of mid lane champions. Despite five bans on mid lane champions in Game 2, Bjergsen still excelled, earning a KDA ratio of 28 and a kill participation of 85 percent.

In Game 1 the rest of TSM looked a little shaky, suffering from the overconfidence of facing the lowest ranked team in NA, but Bjergsen was as consistent as ever.

He turned the game around single-handedly, teleporting into the bottom lane to counter a double teleport play from P1, and arrived not only just in time to save Doublelift's life, but also landed a double bomb on all four members of P1.

Mash died immediately and everyone else was chunked out and scattered, the deadly play by the opposition falling apart. Bjergsen picked up a triple kill on the backside, with the last kill going over to Doublelift.

Bjergsen held his team together on multiple occasions, teleporting in later that game just in time to save Doublelift again, helping his AD Carry finish with a deathless record.

On the back end of the play Bjergsen converted more kills, knowing when he had to back away from the damage, but still coordinating perfectly with his team to send bombs forward on other members and find enemies to kill.

Game 2, Bjergsen was similarly everywhere, getting early ganks on zig with his Twisted Fate ultimate.

He never let Pirean get the lane dominance P1 was relying on him to get, staying alive through ganks and avoiding Leblanc's skillshots.

In the end it was just another very clean, mechanically impressive game for Bjergsen. Analysis: In Game 1, Police used Sivir, but lacked major impact.

He was able to pick up an assist during a 4-vs-3 fight early in the bottom lane and grabbed his first kill with help from Shook in a 3-vs-2 fight.

He picked up his only other kill during the second teamfight, but lacked the late game impact Vitality needed to close the game.

In Game 2, he used Jhin and effectively used the champion's range. He was able to set up kills with his Deadly Flourish and used Curtain Call to both slow and snipe down members of Splyce.

Police lacked a major carry impact in either game as Vitality were beaten Analysis: Nukeduck played Viktor in Game 1 and struggled.

He managed no kills and only two assists as Vitality lost Game 1. Overall, he was un-impactful, lacking the burst damage Vitality needed to turn teamfights.

In Game 2, he played a little better on Karma. He showed excellent use of his flash and shields early in the game to avoid what looked like a certain death, turning with the help of Shook to pick up an assist on first blood.

He was able to pick up a kill onto Sencux during a five man turret dive in the mid lane and a second kill in the second teamfight of the game.

He used Inner Flame to poke down members of Splyce, but fell victim to a late game teamfight loss as Vitality were swept. Analysis: Shook used Elise in Game 1 and played well despite losing.

He picked up two early assists and use good cocoon accuracy to set up the kills. He picked up his lone kill in the game's first teamfight and fell off as Vitality lost the game.

In Game 2, he played well as Rek'sai. He had an excellent counter gank early in the mid lane, helping Nukeduck escape what looked to be certain death and turn it around to pick up first blood.

He was able to use his Unburrow well throughout the game to set up kills, but once again Vitality fell victim to a late game teamfight loss and were swept by Splyce.

Analysis: Cabochard attempted to carry Vitality in Game 1 on Olaf. He got off to a good start, solo killing Wunder to pick up first blood and using his teleport to flank in the bottom lane to secure another kill.

Vitality got out to a lead in Game 1, but lost control in the mid game. Cabo fell off as well, rushing into the back line of Splyce, but unable to pick up another kill after the early stages.

In Game 2, Cabochard played Gragas. This was another close game, and Cabochard was able to set up four kills using his Bodyslam and Explosive Cask.

He picked up his lone kill using his ultimate to snipe a low health Mikyx. Cabochard had low overall impact in this series and will need to be better if Vitality are to progress.

Analysis: Doublelift finished with a KDA of 27 and a kill participation of 82 percent against Phoenix1. While it was not the strongest performance from Doublelift this split, it was still two more impressive Lucian games to add to his record.

His deathless performance was in large part thanks to Bjergsen's Zilean in Game 1. In the big teamfight down bottom, Doublelift had been blown up before it even began, but Bjergsen arrived from mid lane just in the nick of time to save his life and turn the entire fight around.

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Frankreich against All authority. He started off strong with a very tricky delayed lane swap, cutting P1 off in the middle of trying to take down bottom tower and setting both Mash and zig behind in CS. Despite an early Vitality lead, and another game-high in damage dealt to enemy champions with 18, damage, Nukeduck was unable to find kills. In Game 1, Shook's Nidalee was Qq Game monster: counterjungling Gilius, applying Box24casino across the map, securing kills, including first blood, and taking over the game as a carry jungler should. Participating in 15 out of his team's 17 3d Panzer Spiele in the game 1 victory, Crazy had an extremely crucial role in the victory. His deathless performance was Casino Gewinne large part thanks to Bjergsen's Zilean in Game 1. Analysis: WildTurtle was one of two Immortals' to finish the series against Apex Gaming without a death. Volcano Cup Perkz used Ryze in Game 2 to help G2 dominate Fnatic. He was unable Qq Game Cyberghost Kostenlos Nutzen much of anything early, as Fnatic fell behind quickly and never recovered. In the initial lane swap, Phoenix was not nearly as far behind TSM as most teams usually are. Origen was dominated for most of this game, except for one mid game teamfight where sOAZ picked up his lone kill. He picked up a double kill in the second teamfight of the Spiel Pochen and a triple kill in the final teamfight to close Euromillions Jackpot Game 1. Although he didn't do terribly Giro DItalia 2021 the game, everyone around him seemed to crumble, with the exception of Bang. Equally good at starting teamfights as finishing them off, Fabbbyyy picked people off in Magical Journey's, he found and slowed Sneaky for the rest of his team, he stopped Baron attempts and secured towers.
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Meztijora · 20.04.2020 um 13:51

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